Abstracts: The effects of diazepam or midazolam on the dose of propofol required to induce anaesthesia in cats

OBJECTIVES: Assess effects of benzodiazepine administration on the propofol dose required to induce anaesthesia in healthy cats, investigate differences between midazolam and diazepam, and determine an optimal benzodiazepine dose for co-induction.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS: Ninety client-owned cats (ASA I and II) with a median (interquartile range) body mass of 4.0 (3.4-4.9) kg.

METHODS: All . . . → Read More: Abstracts: The effects of diazepam or midazolam on the dose of propofol required to induce anaesthesia in cats

Abstracts: Smoke inhalation in dogs and cats – a retrospective study over 5.5 years

OBJECTIVE: Particularly during household fires, inhalation of hot air and smoke, and the formation of carboxyhaemoglobin and cyanide lead to respiratory tract and lung injury in small animals. Additionally, oxygenation is impaired in most cases. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse smoke exposure, physical examination findings and clinical pathology results as well as . . . → Read More: Abstracts: Smoke inhalation in dogs and cats – a retrospective study over 5.5 years

Abstracts: Comparison of serum concentrations of symmetric dimethylarginine and creatinine as kidney function biomarkers in cats with chronic kidney disease

BACKGROUND: Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to be an accurate and precise biomarker for calculating estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in humans, as well as a more sensitive biomarker than serum creatinine concentration (sCr) for assessing renal dysfunction.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this retrospective study was to report on the utility of measuring serum SDMA concentrations in cats for detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD) before diagnosis by conventional measurement of sCr. Continue reading Abstracts: Comparison of serum concentrations of symmetric dimethylarginine and creatinine as kidney function biomarkers in cats with chronic kidney disease

Gammeherpesvirus a potential pathogen in cats

 

Julia BeattyAn international team of researchers lead by Australian veterinarian Associate Professor Julia Beatty has identified a novel gammaherpesvirus as a widespread potential pathogen in cats.

 

Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) affect a very broad range of species including humans and other primates, ruminants, squirrels, badgers and sea lions. Like all herpesviruses they cause persistent infection but have variable pathogenicity and are often kept at bay by the immune response.

 

In the absence of an effective immune response, due to immune dysfunction or infection of non-adapted host, GHVs may cause devastating diseases including lymphoma and malignant catarral fever.

 

The discovery of Felis catus gammaherpesvirus 1(FcaGHV1) followed a long search that was grounded in Beatty’s Continue reading Gammeherpesvirus a potential pathogen in cats

Connective tissue disorders in domestic animals

Though soft tissue disorders have been recognized and described to some detail in several types of domestic animals and small mammals for some years, not much progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical basis and pathogenesis of these diseases in animals.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome described in dogs already in 1943 and later in cats affects mainly skin in these animals. The involved skin is thin and hyperextensible with easily inflicted injuries resulting in hemorrhagic wounds and atrophic scars. Joint laxity and dislocation common in people are less frequently found in dogs. No systemic complications, such as organ rupture or cardiovascular problems which have devastating consequences in people have been described in cats and dogs. Continue reading Connective tissue disorders in domestic animals