Veterinarian prize-winners named

Encouraging undergraduate veterinary science students to develop excellent written communication skills, The Veterinarian magazine sponsors an essay prize for third year undergraduate students at Sydney University.

On 23 May 2014, 34 students in the Bachelor of Veterinary Science and Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience received The Veterinarian Magazine Prize for Written Communication at . . . → Read More: Veterinarian prize-winners named

Importance of dog morphology in apparent behaviour and trainability: examining how morphological differences in dog breeds can affect perception of their trainability

Introduction

Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) are one of the most morphologically varied species, exhibiting an enormous variety of sizes and body types. Different breeds also exhibit different behavioural traits, and are perceived by dog trainers and owners as having variable abilities to be trained. There is evidence of a strong genetic component in canine behaviour. However, recent studies suggest that some differences, particularly in apparent ability to learn a task (trainability), may have a basis in morphology rather than cognitive ability. Owner behaviour probably plays a strong role as well, particularly in the case of small dogs, which are often considered less obedient than larger dogs (Arhant et al., 2010). Continue reading Importance of dog morphology in apparent behaviour and trainability: examining how morphological differences in dog breeds can affect perception of their trainability

Essay: A review of current methods used to control free-roaming cat populations and their effects on feline welfare

 

Introduction

After recent debate over the best method for reducing free-roaming cat populations (Robertson, 2008), the general consensus is that methods should be effective, practical and, most of all, humane. Free-roaming cats present a variety of issues, such as the spread of zoonotic diseases, wildlife predation, threats to native species, spread of disease to pet cats, and public nuisance (Schmidt et al., 2009). However, cat welfare is also a critical issue, especially inhumane methods of control used on the animals, and alarmingly high rates of disease, ill health and abuse among colonies (Lepczyk et al., 2010; Farnworth et al., 2011). This review assesses different methods of control, with due consideration of cat welfare. Continue reading Essay: A review of current methods used to control free-roaming cat populations and their effects on feline welfare

Veterinary nursing: a job that makes a difference

I started my veterinary nursing career at a relatively late when compared with most nurses. In 2006 at 31 years of age, I decided that I wanted a career that would make a difference. I thought being a human nurse would be the way to go. My partner said, “Don’t be a nurse, be a vet nurse.” This was a career that, until then, I had not even thought about. This was the turning point.

I engaged in a part-time course and while I didn’t quite mesh with my tutors, I excelled in my theoretical studies. Unbeknown to me, my tutors were, quite simply, worried about my practical success. Until I began workplace training. I arrived for my lesson for the evening and came out of my silent shell as I explained the joy of being a part of my first caesarean. My tutors later explained their concerns and that those concerns were put into the past when they saw my passion after this experience. I then launched into being the best nurse I could be.

Six years on, I cannot look back. Every single day is a learning experience and no day is the same. Needless to say my own pets were my guinea pigs during my training and they deserve a medal for the rigours I put them through. They were very tolerant and forgiving, with the help of numerous treats.

My passion for animal care is non-negotiable. This goes without saying, but along with the ups there are the downs and there certainly is a skill to managing the emotional roller coaster that comes with vet nursing. There’s the absolute joy of running puppy pre-school and seeing the uncoordinated fumbling chaos and incompliant cuteness of the first week become the semi-controlled pups showing off their new skills, even if a food lure is needed, in the last week. Then there’s the worry of seeing a pet struggle through illness and the relief when it comes out on the other side, ferociously happy and with an appetite for destruction. There’s also the unfortunate task of euthanasia. Although humane it does hurt to take away a life that has brought so many delightful memories and provided such companionship. My very first euthanasia was more than heart-wrenching, and although I did not know the owners personally, the desperate anguish in their tears drove me home to cry myself to sleep that night. Although now my emotions are contained at these times, my thoughts always draw back to the owners and their feelings of loss. Continue reading Veterinary nursing: a job that makes a difference

Essay: Veterinary practice 101

Veterinary Practice 101

There can surely be few more stressful episodes in a veterinary career than day one, first case.
In the thousands of alternative scenarios I had conjured up whilst lying in my little cot at the veterinary school not one was even remotely like the way my first case actually turned out…

Driving into the Thompson’s dairy farm there were no grateful, smiling farmers waving with relief, no music, no flags, just an uncaring laneway leading in. My dreams had lacked the hollow, empty sense of dread that fear and an overwhelming sensation of loneliness injected into that moment. I contemplated turning back at this point to tell my bosses that I had developed some incapacitating disease such as, say, malaria, and needed to start again some other day – any day – just not now. Instead, I drove in. Continue reading Essay: Veterinary practice 101