Abstracts: The effects of diazepam or midazolam on the dose of propofol required to induce anaesthesia in cats

OBJECTIVES: Assess effects of benzodiazepine administration on the propofol dose required to induce anaesthesia in healthy cats, investigate differences between midazolam and diazepam, and determine an optimal benzodiazepine dose for co-induction.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS: Ninety client-owned cats (ASA I and II) with a median (interquartile range) body mass of 4.0 (3.4-4.9) kg.

METHODS: All . . . → Read More: Abstracts: The effects of diazepam or midazolam on the dose of propofol required to induce anaesthesia in cats

Gammeherpesvirus a potential pathogen in cats

 

Julia BeattyAn international team of researchers lead by Australian veterinarian Associate Professor Julia Beatty has identified a novel gammaherpesvirus as a widespread potential pathogen in cats.

 

Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) affect a very broad range of species including humans and other primates, ruminants, squirrels, badgers and sea lions. Like all herpesviruses they cause persistent infection but have variable pathogenicity and are often kept at bay by the immune response.

 

In the absence of an effective immune response, due to immune dysfunction or infection of non-adapted host, GHVs may cause devastating diseases including lymphoma and malignant catarral fever.

 

The discovery of Felis catus gammaherpesvirus 1(FcaGHV1) followed a long search that was grounded in Beatty’s Continue reading Gammeherpesvirus a potential pathogen in cats

The clinical utility of two human portable blood glucose meters in canine and feline practice

BACKGROUND: Portable blood glucose meters (PBGMs) are useful for serial measurements of blood glucose and creation of blood glucose curves in veterinary practice. However, it is necessary to validate PBGMs designed for people for veterinary use. OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to evaluate the accuracy of 2 PBGMs designed for people for use in dogs and cats. . . . → Read More: The clinical utility of two human portable blood glucose meters in canine and feline practice

Association of urinary cadmium excretion with feline hypertension

Fifty client-owned senior cats (32 normotensive and 18 hypertensive) with renal function ranging from normal to moderately reduced were recruited into a prospective cross-sectional study exploring the association of urinary cadmium excretion and hypertension in cats. Heparinised plasma samples were collected and analysed for routine biochemical parameters. Urine samples were collected via cystocentesis and were analysed . . . → Read More: Association of urinary cadmium excretion with feline hypertension

A cat’s game of hide and seek

Hiding may play an important role in relaxing cats according to University of Queensland honours student Mark Owens.

Working in the Centre of Animal Welfare and Ethics , Owens’ project focuses on the behaviour and welfare of domestic cats in shelters.

“Welfare is a major issue in many countries for animals that are kept in cages, shelters and captive environments like zoos,” he said.

The study looks at cats’ behaviours and emotions, which indicate if they are feeling stressed, anxious, frustrated or content and examines 37 cats over seven days.

Half the cats Owens is observing are provided with a hiding box, and the remaining cats are in open view.

“A big part of my research is whether hiding provides a certain type of enrichment for cats in stressful situations,” Owens said.

“Unfortunately I am not sitting in a room playing and watching cats, I have pre-recorded the cats for 24 hours over seven days, and have just finished coding their behaviours on the videos,” he said.

A cat’s position in the cage, its posture and certain escape behaviours are all observations that contribute to identifying their emotions, stress levels and ability to adapt to their environment. Continue reading A cat’s game of hide and seek