Making a mark on Macquarie Island: Meg’s Story

Picture Graeme Freeman

Picture Graeme Freeman

“Let’s do it – I will write again after I battle through the seals to the gym and back!” Such was Meg McKeown’s response when first contacted about writing about her work with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) on Macquarie Island. A former veterinarian who has retrained as a medical doctor, McKeown is currently employed by the AAD as the doctor servicing Macquarie Island Station, known to the small number of inhabitants as ‘Macca’.

During winter, the human population of the island amounts to little more than a dozen, while in summer the island can accommodate as many as forty people. As McKeown’s comment suggests, however, the vast majority of the island’s other inhabitants include various types of seals, sea lions, petrels, albatross and penguins, many of which use Macquarie Island as a breeding ground.

Located in the Southern Ocean about halfway between New Zealand and Antarctica, Macquarie Island is about as remote as it gets. The island is 34 kilometres long and five kilometres wide, and its climatic conditions are moderated by the surrounding seas, Continue reading Making a mark on Macquarie Island: Meg’s Story