The British pig health schemes: integrated systems for large-scale pig abattoir lesion monitoring

Pig health schemes based on abattoir inspections provide an integrated system to optimise the postmortem detection and the reporting of pathological lesions.

In Great Britain, two initiatives have been implemented by the pig industry: Wholesome Pigs Scotland (WPS) and the BPEX Pig Health Scheme (BPHS). These schemes record the presence of a range of pathological lesions detected by means of detailed inspection of the pluck and the skin of the slaughtered pigs. Continue reading The British pig health schemes: integrated systems for large-scale pig abattoir lesion monitoring

High field MRI arrives at the Animal Referral Hospital

Few areas in veterinary practice have evolved as rapidly in recent years as in the field of diagnostic imaging. Many practices are making the leap to digital radiographs from film and also boast a capability to use diagnostic ultrasound. Now it is the dawn of the age of cross-sectional multiplanar modalities such as computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 2005 the Animal Referral Hospital (ARH) was one of the first in Australia to install a CT scanner which has become integrated into the practice to such an extent that it is hard for the ARH specialist clinicians to imagine practising without it. Now, in another first, The Animal Referral Hospital at Homebush in Sydney has just taken delivery of a Philips 1.0 Tesla Intera MRI system being the first high field superconducting MRI scanner in a veterinary practice in New South Wales. The system is in the final stages of assembly and is anticipated to be running by November 2011. Continue reading High field MRI arrives at the Animal Referral Hospital

Burnout: an occupational hazard we cannot ignore

It is well established that veterinarians suffer a higher suicide rate than the general adult population.

Research by former Australian Veterinary Association President Helen Jones found that veterinarians were four times more likely to take their lives when compared to non-veterinarians.

In absolute numbers, the number of veterinarians who commit suicide is not high, however, compared with the average suicide rate for the general population, it is high. Suicide in our profession is the tip of an iceberg that none of us can afford to ignore. It is likely that far greater numbers of veterinarians suffer from burnout – physical and psychological fatigue brought about by chronic stress and anxiety. Continue reading Burnout: an occupational hazard we cannot ignore

Crimson Post October 2011: With a little help from my friends…

So what does a song written in 1967 by the great Paul McCartney have to do with veterinarians? Probably everything. In Singapore, a small country of five million people where there are 52 clinics (in my last article in June, it said 48 clinics – the numbers have gone up in only four months!), we do not have the advantages of a veterinary school or a register for veterinary specialists. It will probably take a couple more years for our local veterinarians being trained overseas to come home and set up a good network of veterinary specialists. However, this doesn’t stop clinics from providing the standards of care of modern veterinary practice. Thinking outside the box was one of the important steps, next comes calling in the favours. Continue reading Crimson Post October 2011: With a little help from my friends…

Vet attends ultrasound course in China

Picture: ESAVS.A chance find on the internet led an Australian veterinarian to attend a continuing veterinary education course in China. Perth veterinarian Chad Marriott recently travelled to Shenzhen in China to attend an Ultrasound course run by the European School for Advanced Veterinary Studies.

Having found it difficult to find ultrasound courses available in Australia due to their popularity, Marriott initially investigated continuing education courses available in Singapore and Hong Kong. It was through searching online that he then found out about the course being run in China and was attracted to it by the large practical component involved in the course.

The lead lecturer was Hock Gan Heng from Purdue University in Indiana, USA. Continue reading Vet attends ultrasound course in China