The effect of body weight on some welfare indicators in feedlot cattle in a hot environment

Heat stress has important effects on the welfare of livestock. The effects of heat stress in cattle include changes in biological functions and behaviors. The aim of this study from the Department of Animal Science, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey, was to investigate the behavioral differences between light and heavy feedlot cattle reared in a hot . . . → Read More: The effect of body weight on some welfare indicators in feedlot cattle in a hot environment

Re: Dr Coghlan’s article on considering the exposure of cruelty (The Veterinarian, June 2011)

Dear Editor,

Export of live animals for slaughter is a result of one motive – there is money to be made.

In the article, the first response that “Australia has an obligation to animals to continue the trade to countries with mediocre welfare records” beggars belief.

It is painfully obvious that the Meat and Livestock Authority and Livecorp have . . . → Read More: Re: Dr Coghlan’s article on considering the exposure of cruelty (The Veterinarian, June 2011)

Titanium teeth for prison dog

A valuable Victorian prison dog is showing off his new “smile” after receiving titanium incisors from veterinary dentist David Clarke. The German Shepherd, Axel, required the dental work after biting his bed board. Clarke, the owner of K9 Gums in Hallam, Victoria, has also treated big cats, gorillas and bears during his career.

“So much is spent . . . → Read More: Titanium teeth for prison dog

Considering the exposure of cruelty

The exposure on Four Corners of the treatment of Australian cattle exported to Indonesia had a number of interesting features. For one thing, few people would have seen so graphically such relentless and extreme animal cruelty.

As everyone now knows, cattle in the abattoirs variously suffered eye gouging, repeated throat slashing, goading, dragging, thrashing, and so on. Viewers could be in little doubt that those inflicting the violence saw no moral limit, or virtually no limit, to what may be done to these animals.

Many people, perhaps for the first time, were deeply disturbed and even haunted by the way animals were treated. Some may long remember certain images, such as the sight of a steer visibly trembling in fear as it watched other animals suffer the treatment it was itself moments away from experiencing.

Politicians and members of the public and cattle industry labelled the treatment “disgusting”. More than usual for a news story about animals, there was much public and media discussion, and significant political action, such as the rapidly organised campaign by GetUp.

The event also led to unusual alliances, between some farmers, meatworkers, and animal groups, and between the welfare-orientated RSPCA and the rights-orientated Animals Australia which obtained the footage.

The evidence raises general questions about our moral responsibility for animals sent to any country, not just Indonesia, which may have lower standards of care. It also invites us to reflect on the tensions between economics, culture and religion, and the treatment of animals. Continue reading Considering the exposure of cruelty

$10,000 scholarship for animal welfare research

An annual $10,000 scholarship to support research into improving farm animal welfare has been launched.
The Rosalind Dixon Memorial Scholarship for Farm Animal Welfare Research is supported by the University of Queensland (UQ) Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics and the Humane Society International.
Co-ordinated by UQ’s Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics, the scholarship is available to students undertaking Honours or postgraduate research into issues in intensive farming at any Australian university.
The scholarship was donated by Garth Dixon, in memory of his wife Rosalind Dixon. The Dixons have made a long-stranding contribution to the preservation of native vegetation in NSW.
“I have had exposure to the suffering that factory farmed animals endure,” Dixon said. Continue reading $10,000 scholarship for animal welfare research