SA gets first veterinary CT scanner

South Australia’s first veterinary CT (computer tomography) scanner, suitable for animals of all sizes, has been launched at the University of Adelaide’s Roseworthy campus.

The new scanner is part of the university’s veterinary health centre and is available for clinical consultations for general public and referrals from other veterinary services.

It also will be used for research and teaching in the Animal and Veterinary Sciences School.

“This new state-of-the-art equipment means we can provide the South Australian general and veterinary communities with top-quality diagnostic imaging so animals of all descriptions can receive the most appropriate and highest quality clinical care,” Wayne Hein, new Dean of the Roseworthy campus and school head said. Continue reading SA gets first veterinary CT scanner

New 24-hour veterinary emergency service for Adelaide University

A new team of vets and vet nurses has joined the Companion Animal Health Centre at the University of Adelaide’s Roseworthy Campus, to staff a new 24-hour emergency veterinary service open to the public over weekends and public holidays.

The 24-hour weekend and public holiday emergency service is available from Friday night through until Monday morning.

The service complements the existing general practice and specialist referral services offered by the Companion Animal Health Centre during normal weekday opening hours. Continue reading New 24-hour veterinary emergency service for Adelaide University

Call for new thinking on disease prediction and planning

A University of Adelaide scientist says much more could be done to predict the likelihood and spread of serious disease – such as tuberculosis (TB) or foot-and-mouth disease – in Australian wildlife and commercial stock.

Corey Bradshaw and colleagues have evaluated freely available software tools that provide a realistic prediction of the spread of disease among animals.

They used a combination of models to look at the possible spread of TB among feral water buffalo in the Northern Territory.

In the 1980s and 1990s the government of the time began a broad-scale culling program, culling tens of thousands of buffalo.

“The cull successfully reduced or eradicated buffalo from major pastoral lands in the Northern Territory, taking tuberculosis with it, but since then there has been no major follow-up culling. The buffalo population is re-invading the formerly culled areas,” Bradshaw, Director of Ecological Modelling at the University of Adelaide’s Environment Institute, said.

“Although Australia now trades its livestock under the ‘TB-free’ banner, the disease is prevalent throughout Africa, southern Europe, the Middle East and parts of Asia. Realistically, it’s only a matter of time before it rears its ugly head again here. If it does, it could potentially cost our cattle industry billions of dollars.” Continue reading Call for new thinking on disease prediction and planning