Abstracts: Invited review: animal-based indicators for on-farm welfare assessment for dairy goats

This paper reviews animal-based welfare indicators to develop a valid, reliable, and feasible on-farm welfare assessment protocol for dairy goats. The indicators were considered in the light of the 4 accepted principles (good feeding, good housing, good health, appropriate behavior) subdivided into 12 criteria developed by the European Welfare Quality program. We will only examine the practical indicators to be used on-farm, excluding those requiring the use of specific instruments or laboratory analysis and those that are recorded at the slaughterhouse. Continue reading Abstracts: Invited review: animal-based indicators for on-farm welfare assessment for dairy goats

Handling and welfare of bovine livestock at local abattoirs in Bangladesh

The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) allows rope casting and the tying of legs for nonhuman animal slaughter without stunning. The handling and welfare of bovine livestock (Bos indicus and Bubalus bubalis) were studied in 8 local abattoirs in 5 districts of Bangladesh. A total of 302 animals were evaluated. At the local abattoirs, approximately . . . → Read More: Handling and welfare of bovine livestock at local abattoirs in Bangladesh

The effect of reduced loading density on pig welfare during long distance transport

Transport of animals is a stressful procedure often resulting in significant losses for the slaughter plant. This study aimed to determine whether or not pigs would benefit from a loading density (low density (LD)) (179 kg/m2) below the normal EU standard loading density (normal density (ND)) (235 kg/m2).

Eight similar, 550-km-long road journeys were followed in which fattening pigs were transported across Germany from farm to slaughter plant. During each journey all pigs were transported at LD (n=4) or ND (n=4). Continue reading The effect of reduced loading density on pig welfare during long distance transport

Overheated herds

This year’s higher than average summer temperatures have highlighted a growing animal welfare issue for the US livestock industry, and it is one that will prove equally relevant for Australia’s farmers as we head into warmer weather. Cattle prefer a cool climate, and suffer heat stress when they become too hot. If symptoms of the animals’ discomfort go unrecognised, a dairy cow’s milk production and fertility can be affected, while the result for intensively farmed beef cattle may be growth and weight loss, which leads to reduced meat production.

As some of the physiological responses to excessive heat are experienced internally by cows, and therefore less likely to be noticed until the animals are severely affected, livestock researchers from the University of Arizona, led by dairy specialist Robert Collier, have developed a vaginal sensor that can measure a cow’s core body temperature, and a leg sensor able to determine whether the cow had been sitting or standing. Continue reading Overheated herds

Community partnering as a tool for improving live release rate in animal shelters in the United States

Collaboration among all shelters and non-human animal welfare groups within a community along with the transparent, shared reporting of uniform data have been promoted as effective ways to increase the number of animals’ lives saved. This article summarises the shelter intakes, outcomes, and live release rate (LRR) from 6 geographically diverse communities participating in the . . . → Read More: Community partnering as a tool for improving live release rate in animal shelters in the United States