Veterinarians’ attitude to infection control ‘complacent’

Navneet Dhand.

Infection control practices of Australian veterinarians are dangerously inadequate, according to a University of Sydney study published this month.

The study, published in Preventative Veterinary Medicine, found that 44.9 per cent of veterinarians had contracted a zoonotic disease through their work. Based on a survey of veterinarians attending the 2011 Australian Veterinary Association annual conference, . . . → Read More: Veterinarians’ attitude to infection control ‘complacent’

Survey of the frequency and perceived stressfulness of ethical dilemmas encountered in UK veterinary practice

The scale of the ethical challenges faced by veterinary surgeons and their perceived stressful consequences were investigated via a short questionnaire, completed by 58 practising veterinary surgeons.

Respondents were asked to report how frequently they faced ethical dilemmas, and to rate on a simple numerical scale (zero to 10) how stressful they found three common scenarios.

Fifty seven per cent of respondents reported that they faced one to two dilemmas per week, while 34 per cent stated they typically faced three to five dilemmas per week. Continue reading Survey of the frequency and perceived stressfulness of ethical dilemmas encountered in UK veterinary practice

Burnout: an occupational hazard we cannot ignore

It is well established that veterinarians suffer a higher suicide rate than the general adult population.

Research by former Australian Veterinary Association President Helen Jones found that veterinarians were four times more likely to take their lives when compared to non-veterinarians.

In absolute numbers, the number of veterinarians who commit suicide is not high, however, compared with the average suicide rate for the general population, it is high. Suicide in our profession is the tip of an iceberg that none of us can afford to ignore. It is likely that far greater numbers of veterinarians suffer from burnout – physical and psychological fatigue brought about by chronic stress and anxiety. Continue reading Burnout: an occupational hazard we cannot ignore