Vet set to cross Antarctica with ‘boob-sled’

Geoff on the ice.Greencross Robina vet Geoff Wilson will swap the latex gloves for three inch-thick gauntlets when he sets off on a gruelling 3300 kilometre trek across Antarctica next month.

Geoff is attempting to become the first Australian to cross the Antarctic continent solo and unassisted – a journey which he plans to complete dragging a giant pink “boob sled” with the aim of encouraging women to be “breast aware”, and with the hope of raising $1 million for the McGrath Foundation.

The idea for the mission, dubbed the Pink Polar Expedition, came about when Wilson’s long-time friend, Kate Carlyle was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time at just 34 years old.

“I have known Katie for 15 years, since I started looking after her Jack Russell cross Pugs – and now that the Pink Polar Expedition has come about, I joke that I’ve been looking after her jugs for a very long time,” Wilson said. Continue reading Vet set to cross Antarctica with ‘boob-sled’

New 24-hour veterinary emergency service for Adelaide University

A new team of vets and vet nurses has joined the Companion Animal Health Centre at the University of Adelaide’s Roseworthy Campus, to staff a new 24-hour emergency veterinary service open to the public over weekends and public holidays.

The 24-hour weekend and public holiday emergency service is available from Friday night through until Monday morning.

The service complements the existing general practice and specialist referral services offered by the Companion Animal Health Centre during normal weekday opening hours. Continue reading New 24-hour veterinary emergency service for Adelaide University

Organic farming: where are the vets?

An unexpected aspect of the growth in popularity of organic farming has revealed a lack of vets trained to treat organically farmed animals. This shortage was highlighted recently in the US, and has also been recognised in the UK. With growing public concern about intensively farmed animals, and a rise in demand for organically grown meat, similar challenges could soon face Australia’s organic farmers should their animals require veterinary treatment.

The results of a survey conducted in the US recently, that looked at the issue of veterinary care for organic producers, revealed herd health presented few challenges for most farmers, since they were generally able to handle most health problems themselves without consulting a vet.

The study was led by Jenny O’Neill, an Iowa State University graduate student in sustainable agriculture, and participants in the survey involved members of the Iowa Veterinary Medical Association who work with food animals, and organic livestock producers certified by the US Department of Agriculture. Continue reading Organic farming: where are the vets?