Clinical Zoo: Good health for a great ape

Taronga Vet Frances checks the teeth of Jantan the orangutan

PIcture Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Cardiovascular disease can manifest in progressive heart failure or sudden cardiac death in humans and other animals. But diagnosing early heart disease is challenging when little is known about normal cardiovascular function in a particular species.

That is why Taronga Zoo enlisted the expertise of veterinary cardiologist Niek Beijerink during a recent health check of its resident Sumatran Orang-utans. Aside from attending to routine health care and husbandry needs, annual health exams in zoos are an excellent opportunity to collect baseline data, which becomes important in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of disease.

The Zoo is home to two adult Orang-utans, Willow, a 58kg female, and Jantan, a 96.8kg male. The inseparable pair have enjoyed excellent health, thanks to the Zoo’s proactive approach to their well-being.

Orang-utans are vulnerable to many of the same diseases that affect humans – gastrointestinal upsets, flu signs and runny noses.

They could potentially contract human flu,” senior veterinarian Larry Vogelnest said. “Some zoos vaccinate all great apes against influenza. We have strict protocols here: any staff member with cold of flu signs or other illnesses must not enter areas where great apes are kept.”

In Orang-utan rehabilitation facilities overseas, common health problems include gastrointestinal parasites and gastrointestinal disease outbreaks due to agents including salmonella or shigella. Many such outbreaks are due to contaminated or spoiled food and can be prevented through excellent husbandry and hygiene.

Male Orang-utans sport a particularly large laryngeal sac that is inflated to create a loud roaring noise, known as a long call. The long call signals other males to stay away, whilst attracting females for courtship. The down side of having this large laryngeal sac is that it is a common site for infections.

We’ve seen it previously and it can be quite a difficult disease to treat,” Vogelnest said. Continue reading Clinical Zoo: Good health for a great ape

Vogelnest’s Vietnam mission

Vietnam2Taronga senior veterinarian Larry Vogelnest is involved in an ambitious mission to save Vietnam’s Cat Ba langurs from extinction.

Cat Ba langurs, also known as Golden-headed langurs, number about 50 in the wild and are exclusively found on the island of Cat Ba in Northern Vietnam.

Vogelnest applied for the task after reading an advertisement that was distributed worldwide on internet listservs.

“I thought it looked interesting and challenging, and ended up getting one of the two positions available, and in the end they asked me to choose the second vet, somebody that I was happy to work with,” he said.

“I immediately thought of Michael Lynch from Melbourne Zoo because we have done a lot of work together, he has had experience in projects in southeast Asia, and was happy to be involved.”

Vogelnest and Lynch previously worked together in 2006 on the import of Thai elephants to Taronga and Melbourne Zoos for a breeding program. Continue reading Vogelnest’s Vietnam mission