We’re moving!

The Veterinarian is moving offices! Please update your contacts.

DIRECTOR
Clem Martin | clem.martin@vetmag.com.au | + 61 2 9487 6627 | Fax: + 61 2 9487 5516

EDITOR
Luke Martin | luke.martin@vetmag.com.au | + 61 403 292 099 | Fax: + 61 2 9487 5516

NATIONAL SALES AND MARKETING MANAGER
James Martin | james.martin@vetmag.com.au | + 61 432 575 877 | Fax: + 61 2 9487 5516

The Veterinarian welcomes letters to the Editor and article submissions. Please email . . . → Read More: We’re moving!

Face to Face: A vision of hope

10515280_1012122145481790_153767686388117046_oA chance encounter as a student sparked a compassionate plan in Sam Kovac

One day back in 2009, having just enjoyed a family lunch in Woolloomooloo, Sam Kovac was walking back to his car when he came across a homeless man with a cattle dog. The cattle dog was coughing so badly it was having difficulty breathing, and Kovac – then a veterinary student – stopped to ask whether the man had taken the animal to a vet. He said he had been to two veterinary clinics, but that because of his appearance and the vets’ assumption that he had no money to pay for treatment, no one was willing to examine his dog.

Meeting the homeless man and his cattle dog proved to be a lifechanging experience for Kovac, who began thinking about companion animals of homeless people of Sydney. He realised companion animals of underprivileged owners were no less loved than other pets, but the lack of funds to obtain or pursue treatment for their animals placed financially disadvantaged owners in an awful position: they felt that had to bargain over the life or death of their pet. Continue reading Face to Face: A vision of hope

Abstracts: Equine welfare during exercise: an evaluation of breathing, breathlessness and bridles

Horses engaged in strenuous exercise display physiological responses that approach the upper functional limits of key organ systems, in particular their cardiorespiratory systems. Maximum athletic performance is therefore vulnerable to factors that diminish these functional capacities, and such impairment might also lead to horses experiencing unpleasant respiratory sensations, i.e., breathlessness. The aim of this review is to use existing literature on equine cardiorespiratory physiology and athletic performance to evaluate the potential for various types of breathlessness to occur in exercising horses. Continue reading Abstracts: Equine welfare during exercise: an evaluation of breathing, breathlessness and bridles

Vet ethics: guardian dogs

I recently attended the annual AVA conference in Melbourne. In one of the talks, Chris Johnson, a Professor of Wildlife Conservation at the University of Tasmania, discussed the use of so-called guardian dogs to protect livestock on Australian farms. This idea involves a new approach to a longstanding animal welfare and farming problem.

Livestock such as sheep and lambs are sometimes lost to predation from foxes, dingoes and wild dogs. A traditional approach to this problem is to lethally cull potential offenders. Methods of culling include shooting and baiting with poisons. The 1080 poison causes muscle tremors, convulsions and death. Few people would doubt that baits have significant welfare implications.

Yet predation of livestock also has welfare consequences. The mauling of lambs not only harms the lambs but also creates great anxiety for the farmers, both because of concern for their animals and for their own livelihoods. Continue reading Vet ethics: guardian dogs

Abstracts: The use of imepitoin (Pexion) on fear and anxiety related problems in dogs – a case series

BACKGROUND:
Fear and anxiety based problems are common in dogs. Alongside behaviour modification programmes, a range of psychopharmacological agents may be recommended to treat such problems, but few are licensed for use in dogs and the onset of action of some can be delayed. Continue reading Abstracts: The use of imepitoin (Pexion) on fear and anxiety related problems in dogs – a case series

Abstracts: Australian regulation of animal use in science and education: a critical appraisal 

One of the touchstone principles in Australia’s regulation of the use of animals for scientific and educational purposes is reduction, refinement and replacement (3Rs). However, the use of animals for scientific and educational purposes is increasing in Australia, raising concerns about the effectiveness of the current regulatory framework in achieving the objectives of the 3Rs. Continue reading Abstracts: Australian regulation of animal use in science and education: a critical appraisal